Terrines And PÔtÚs

 

Any bone and sinew free poultry or game meat can be ground up turned into a spreadable pâté, or moulded and cooked as a terrine. Don't overcook the meat; pâtés and terrines are at their best when moist and juicy.

MAKING A PAN-FRIED LIVER PATE

One of the easiest ways to make a pâté is by pan-frying livers quickly, working them to a fine or coarse purée in a food processor, then chilling until firm in the refrigerator. Chicken livers are favoured because of their mild flavour and soft texture. Take care not to overcook them or they will toughen.

COOKING THE LIVERS

Keep them moving in hot butter in the centre of the pan, so they do not stick or burn, until pink-tinged.

ADDING CLARIFIED BUTTER

Spoon liquid clarified butter over the pâté to keep it airtight - the mixture may discolour in contact with air.

MAKING A RABBIT TERRINE

The technique here is to contrast a creamy, smooth farce with thin slivers of tender meat to make an easy layered terrine. The addition of aspic after baking helps keep the terrine moist. It also gives the terrine a professional-looking finish.

1. Line a 1.5 litre terrine with about 15 rindless streaky bacon rashers. Make sure there are no gaps and allow the ends to overhang.

2. Put half the farce in the terrine, cover with pieces of rabbit in an even layer, then spoon in the remaining farce.

3. Fold over the overhanging rashers, arranging them in an attractive pattern. Cover the mould and bake in a bain marie at 180°C for 2 hours.

4. Slowly pour 300­-350 ml liquid aspic over the terrine. Add it a little at a time so that it soaks in. Let cool, then refrigerate until set before slicing.